Tag Archives: Internet Marketing

Markethive: Multi-Million Dollar Social Marketing Platform- In Pre-Launch

Multi-Million Dollar Inbound Social Marketing Platform In Pre-Launch

Markethive has created a Multi-Million Dollar inbound social marketing platform that will rival the existing social media platforms in many ways.

Many times change comes along and we don't recognize it until its too late. Internet Marketing has changed with the advent of Millennials all searching for information specific as to what they want, no longer does SEO [Search Engine Optimization] play a major role in getting noticed on the internet. Millennials want to find information, not have it jammed down their throat.

They are seekers not persuaders!

The new trend of getting noticed on the internet is through referral basis. No longer do you have to pack your articles or website full of key words and hope the search engines notice them and give them top ranking, today you just have to make sure your message gets out to the public in a social way where people notice it, and then come to you for more information. Social Infusion Marketing is the new way to market your goods and services with people seeing what you are offering, and when the time comes that the person needs your offer they will take action.

Markethive has perfected Social Infusion Marketing with a unique social platform that allows anyone who is interested in marketing their products or company to be able to do it without paying huge sums of money to get noticed. No longer does anyone have to put up with the confusing language of the SEO guru's who charge outrageous sums of money with little results, you can do it yourself!

The Markethive platform is Free to join and use, and is funded partially by an advertising platform that enables the entrepreneur to get a huge reach with low cost. Markethive is built for the Global entrepreneur, and gives them a level playing field in a world that is cluttered with everyone trying to get into each others pocket financially.

So if you have read this far, Markethive is rolling out a Pre-Launch offer, before it goes to Crowdfunding, to anyone who want to join up and learn how to use this platform to grow their business. The Social part is being built by adding as many people as possible and assisting them in growing their business through Social Infusion Marketing.

To join just click here and you will be directed to a sign up page where you can enter the platform and poke around. Here is the secret, when the platform goes to CrowdFunding the people responsible will share in the rewards, so don't waste time this launch will be HUGE!

Thanks for reading,
Dr. Raymond Jewell

Thanks to Dr. Raymond Jewell for this informative article.  Dr. Jewell is a leading Economist specializing in the Small and Home Based Business Marketplace. He is a Alpha Founder with Markethive and manages several blogs on the hive. Dr. Jewell is a professional Network Marketer and represents several companies successfully.

The Realities of Working Online: Ten Glimpses

The Realities of Working Online: Ten Glimpses

 

Being able to earn a living by working on your own websites and projects is a dream scenario for many people, no doubt for the reader as well. There are countless people working in “regular” jobs that would love to have more freedom and the ability to make more money, and having a successful online business is an ideal solution.

So although it is an ideal situation I am sure that many people who would like to be in that situation don’t have a very accurate idea of what it is really like to earn a living by running your own online business.

This article will cover ten realities about working as a self-employed blogger or internet marketer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. You must exercise self-discipline

When I first left my full-time job to work online I had a lot of friends and family members comment about my schedule or ask questions about how much I’d be working. For some reason a lot of people think the flexibility that comes with running an online business means that you can be lazy.

If I had left my job to start a traditional business no one would ask me if I’d be sleeping in, but with an online business that seemed to be a common assumption.

In reality, earning a living from your own websites and blogs requires a great deal of discipline. There is no boss telling you to start work at a specific time, no designated amount of time for a lunch break, no exact limit on vacation days, and no one telling you what you need to be working on and how to spend your time.

You have to be able to make all of these decisions on your own, and you’ll need discipline to stay on task and to treat it like the business that it is.

2. Your income is not likely to be steady

One of the challenges is getting used to an income that will fluctuate from month-to-month and year-to-year.

If you’re used to working at a job with a consistent salary, like I was, there will be some changes once your primary income is from your own online projects, whether it is from websites that you own or from services that you provide to clients.

You can’t always know ahead of time how much money you’ll make in any given month, so you’ll need to be able to get comfortable with this situation. It’s a good idea to learn to live below your means, at least at first, to avoid a situation where your income is less than expected and you can’t afford to pay your bills.

3. Self-employment doesn’t mean that you don’t have a job or a boss

Working on your own websites and projects can possibly allow you a lot more freedom than you would have with a typical job, but this is not necessarily always the case.

For example, leaving a full-time job I had been working on growing my own website for about a year and a half, and even though the income from that site was growing nicely, it wasn’t enough to replace the salary I was used to making.

To supplement the income from my site I also had to do a lot of work as a freelance blogger and also was able to do some web design work for clients. The clients that paid me for writing and designing essentially became my new boss at my new job. While working as a freelancer does offer a little more flexibility than a typical 9-5 job, the ones who hire you are still essentially your bosses.

Whether it is an online business or a traditional business, being self-employed doesn’t mean that you don’t have a job.

If I stop working today there would be some residual income from product sales, AdSense, and affiliate products that would continue to come for some time, but if I did not continue to work on these things they would decrease and eventually dry up.

I would not, at this point, have a business that would run very efficiently or effectively without my own continued efforts. Essentially, I replaced my old full-time job as an employee with my current full-time job where I work for myself.

Yes, I do make more money now, I have more flexibility, and I enjoy what I do, but I have to remind myself that I still have a job.

The ultimate goal for most anyone who works online, myself included, is to eventually become a business owner where the business can be sustained without full-time effort or hours from the owner.

4. It takes significant time to build a business

When someone starts a traditional business they usually understand that it will take some time for the business to become profitable. Some successful businesses have a development phase which may take years before they really turn a profit.

When it comes to online businesses, most people have an expectation of seeing instant results. Building a business requires time, whether it is an online business or a more traditional business.

One important advantage that you have with online business is that the expenses and initial investment will usually be significantly lower when compared to a traditional business, but becoming profitable still takes time.

Over the years I’ve seen many people start websites or blogs or online businesses with great expectations but they give up within a month or two when they realize it’s going to take more time and effort than they expected.

You have to approach your online projects with the right mindset and realistic expectations; then you’ll be well ahead of most people and you’ll have a much better chance of sticking with it until you attain your goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. You will probably be misunderstood as to what you do for a living

I’ve worked on my own websites and blogs for more than 5 years now, and most of my friends and family really don’t have a good idea what I do or how to make money. If you tell people you make money by blogging, most people can’t conceive how you actually make money with a blog, and may get some pretty interesting questions.

6. Don’t forget to reckon with your business expenses!

In the world of internet marketing and “make money online” blogs you see a lot of products and courses that make specific claims about the amount of money that some other person was able to earn, but very rarely will you see many details about what expenses are involved. Not too long ago I purchased a product from a well-known marketer showing how easy it is to make $1,000 virtually overnight by following a specific system.

The course shows the exact amount of money that this person supposedly made using paid traffic, but there is no mention of how much money was spent to get that traffic.

Generating $1,000 in gross receipts is not the same thing as turning $1,000 in profit. Business expenses are often minimized when it comes to making money online, but it is crucial to consider these expenses when calculating how much you expect to earn.

Pat Flynn of Smart Passive Income is a rare example of someone who mentions expenses in his monthly income reports.

7. Income potential is known to be high

With a traditional job your potential earnings may be limited by various criteria: the type of work that you do, the length of time that you’ve worked for the company, the degrees or certifications that you have, the co-workers salaries, and even the amount that your boss makes. In some cases these limitations are rather arbitrary and preclude you from earning what you are truly worth to your employer.

Earning a living from your own websites and projects is completely different. There are no limitations, and if are able to become good at what you do the potential is very high. Of course, there are no guarantees that you will make more than what you could make at a traditional job, and many people will never be able to reach that level. However, the potential is there, and if are willing to work hard, have some patience, and learn a lot along the way, there are many opportunities for making money online.

8. You’re building assets by the work you do online

When I left my full-time job I took my last pay check a week or two later, and that was the end of my income from that job. In 2013 I finally reached the position of being able to sell the website that had been making income at for several years (and also my primary “job”), and when I walked away from that website/job I was able to turn a healthy profit from the buyer..

When you’re working on your own websites and projects it is like building assets that can be used to bring in future revenue for you, or which could be sold to someone else. A profitable website is truly an asset. The mailing list you’re building is an asset. Any goods or services you create are assets. All of these things help you to earn a living now, and unlike a typical job, you also have the potential to get turn a healthy profit by selling the assets.

When you’re working for someone else as an employee it is the other way around in that you’re essentially helping them to build assets for their future profit, and they are paying you in return for that kind of work.

This ability to build valuable assets would surely be the favorite part of what I do. Going back to point #7, being able to build and sell assets has everything to do with the high income potential.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. The future is not something you can count on

Things in the online world change very quickly and you have to be able to adapt in order to remain successful. Digg sold for $500,000 in 2012, just four years after they turned down a $400 million dollar offer. Other popular sites like MySpace also have become out of favor fairly rapidly.

It’s not just huge, massively popular social media sites that can be impacted by changing trends. The algorithm changes by Google have led to serious damage for businesses large and small over the past couple of years for those who may be vulnerable.

When it comes to online business, the future is not guaranteed. You’ll need to be able to implement creatively and constantly learning and improving, because things can change very quickly.

10. You’ll have to be flexible and think ahead of the curve

Because things can change so quickly, and because the future can be a gamble, as an internet marketer you’ll need to flexibility and willingness to evolve. You’ll need to improve upon what you are presently doing and learn new things in an ongoing way. If you’re able to keep adapting you will have better odds to remain successful well into the future.

Merrill Sloan

Contributor

Become The Best Blogger

Become The Best Blogger.

Is it necessary to have a goal to become the best blogger in your niche? Is content marketing something that the public on the web is seeking? Many have asked that questions about the value of content marketing and wondered if it is limited to a few types of businesses. This article was printed in Hubspot in August 2014 titled, How To Become The Best Blogger In Your Niche. 

Back in 2012, Max Nisen wrote, “Content marketing is one of the biggest new trends.” He reported NewsCred’s CEO Shafqat Islam as saying, “Every Fortune 2000 company today is a candidate for content marketing. If they're not doing it, they will be.”

Two years later, Nisen and Islam’s prophecies have come to pass. We are in the age of content marketing — and it's showing no signs of going away. The content marketing arena is now so vast and so complex that people are starting to get lost. Don't believe me? Just take a look at this hodgepodge of an infographic from LUMA:

luma-content-marketing

In spite of the scary complexity, blogging is still the one of the most powerful weapons in the content marketer’s arsenal. And the better the blog, the better the content marketing efforts.

So here’s my thesis: If you are the best blogger in your niche, you can be the most successful in your niche. It’s only logical. If blogging is the core of content marketing, and content marketing is the path to success, then we must conclude that being a kickass blogger is the path to marketing success.

And here’s the really good news: You can become the best blogger in your niche. In the post that follows, I will provide three points that explain exactly how to gain that edge.

1) Know your audience.

Answer the most important question:  “Who is my audience?”

Too often, bloggers start with the wrong question. They ask things like:

  • How can I be interesting?
  • What can I write about?
  • What will make this post more engaging?

Those are great questions, but they are totally meaningless unless you first understand your audience.

I came across a line recently that stuck with me:

 

pngbase64c3c9af76173e7e56

When you blog for someone, you will have plenty of things to write about. What’s more, you’ll communicate in the right way — you'll be more "human" and familiar if you treat your audience like real people.

As you ask the big question, “who is my audience,” keep in mind these additional questions that will help you develop a deeper knowledge (From University of Maryland's Writing Resources):

 

  • What is the relationship between the writer and the reader?
  • How much does the reader know
  • Is the audience likely to agree or disagree with you?
  • What will the reader do with the information?

The clearer your view of your audience, the better your writing will be.

Your audience is smaller than you think.

Keep in mind that your audience is probably smaller than you think. Traffic metrics do not reflect an accurate count of your engaged audience. A better way to understand your audience is through engagement metrics.

In a study conducted by Chartbeat on Slate readership, they discovered that the most engaged readers were those who scrolled below the fold. A full 86% of engagement took place when readers scrolled to read an article.

 

chartbeat

Also, share metrics tend to skew the perception of an engaged audience. The people who share your articles don’t always read the whole thing, as an Upworthy study showed. This chart below indicates how long users stayed on a page compared to the point at which they shared the article.

attention_minutes

Your true readership is made of those who are engaged — the users who read your entire article and absorb the material.

You can build your audience.

Even though it is smaller than you think, you can also build your audience. Great bloggers grow in size and reputation. That’s what this article will tell you how to do.

The more you blog, the better knowledge you’ll have of your audience. You discover what they love, what they don’t love, what makes them click, and what makes them convert. In my Complete Guide to Building Your Blog Audience, I wrote this:

"A great blog begins with the content you create, but to be successful, a blog also needs a strong community or audience."

So you should not only learn who your audience is, but also shape that audience, too. To a certain extent, you get to decide who your audience is, and what they want to hear.

Everything starts with audience. If you know your audience and speak directly to them, they’re going to love you.

2) Be consistent.

You’re not going to be a wildly successful blogger unless you’re consistent.

An article on NewIncite had this to say about consistency:

"Quality of content and consistency are the most important factors in setting up your schedule … Consistency will keep them engaged, build brand awareness, and — if done right — help convert them to buyers."

It’s easy to talk about consistency, but it’s hard to do consistency. Bruce Springsteen wasn’t exactly a content marketing professional, but he had a great line about consistency:

"Getting an audience is hard. Sustaining an audience is hard. It demands a consistency of thought, of purpose and of action over a long period of time."

What worked for The Boss works for content marketers, too. You want to be a blogging rockstar? Take it from a real rockstar: Consistency matters.

Being a rockstar blogger feels good. But waking up early every day, hitting the keyboard every day, and maxing out your mental resources every day doesn't always feel good. But that gritty pain is what consistency is made of.

How often should you blog?

So, what does consistency mean in real numbers? How often do you need to publish a blog post? To answer this question, I’m going to be all evasive and tell you to refer to point one — know your audience.

Joe Pulizzi of Content Marketing Institute wrote this on the topic of blogging frequency:

"As long as the blog post serves these two goals it’s worth doing a post: 1) Is a compelling and interesting story to your target audience (the reader), and 2) Serves the objective for your blog. If that means five posts per week, great.  If it’s one per week, that’s fine to. [sic] Focus on whether or not you have a story worth telling."

I can’t give you a hard and fast number. I can, however, recommend a minimum threshold — you should aim for at least one post a week.

Why? Frequent output — i.e. consistency — is positively correlated with greater traffic, as indicated by HubSpot’s research.

blog-slide-7-resized-600

In addition, HubSpot discovered that bloggers with higher output had better lead generation results:

blog-slide-10-resized-600

So consistency leads to accumulation of content, and the more content you have, the more results you’ll get.

3) Be totally transparent.

If you’re more transparent than anyone else in your niche, you’ll get more readers. People crave transparency.

Kevan Lee, Buffer’s blogger par excellence, writes this in his article, "The Anatomy of a Perfect Blog Post:"

"We aim for an element of storytelling in each of the posts we write, often starting a blog post with a personal anecdote or moment of transparency."

Transparency is a tricky thing. On the one hand, relationships are built on trust and transparency. But it’s hard to be transparent. Nan Russell, in Psychology Today, had some cogent insights about transparency:

"People want other people, not necessarily themselves, to be transparent … Some people find transparency threatening, especially at work, while others find it exhilarating. Some confuse transparency with authenticity, or think transparency means communicating everything or knowing everything they want to know."

Transparency is important in blogging, because you are building trust, developing relationships, and growing an audience. At the same time you must exercise your transparency in a thoughtful and intentional way. You’re not going to spill business secrets, gossip about others, or divulge information that puts you in a dangerous personal situation.

The best advice that I’ve read comes from the article I cited above, regarding the role of transparency in the workplace. These principles, as I’ve restated them and applied to blogging, will make you appropriately transparent:

 

  • Tell stories that demonstrate your openness and vulnerability.
  • Make sure you are respecting your boundaries of confidentiality and the confidentiality of others.
  • Use your transparency to help others, not simply for the sake of being transparent.

When we try to become transparent, we’re usually not as transparent as we think we are. But if we work hard to share personal stories — appropriate details included — we’ll get better at it.

Transparency engages readers and turns your blog into something that readers love. As I’ve studied many blogging niches, I’ve discovered that the bloggers with the greatest degree of personal disclosure are the most successful. So if you want to be a successful blogger, you’ve got to get personal and transparent.

Conclusion

Being the best blogger in your niche has very little to do with writing technique and flawless grammar. Those technical skills kowtow to some way more important things:

 

  1. Knowing your audience.
  2. Being consistent.
  3. Being totally transparent.

If you put these techniques into play, you’re on the path to blogging domination and content marketing success.

*How to Become the Best Blogger in Your NicheWritten by Neil Patel | @neilpatel

DR. Raymond Jewell, is a leading economist and Home Based Business Consultant. He is a Alpha Legacy member of Markethive and manages several blogs on the hive. Markethive Systems is just a click and a sign up and you can witness the power of the Hive first hand.